Options when you turn 65

When you turn 65 (and have been in KiwiSaver for at least five years), you’ll gain access to your KiwiSaver savings. It's really important to consider how your savings will best meet your financial needs in retirement, so below you'll find some information to help you with your choices.

When you're eligible to access your KiwiSaver savings you'll have three options:

1. Leave your savings in your KiwiSaver account

You can leave your savings in your KiwiSaver account and withdraw them when you need to later on.

There is a misconception that when you turn 65 you must withdraw your KiwiSaver savings and reinvest in a term deposit or standard savings account. This is simply not the case. KiwiSaver is a great way to keep saving after 65, and is typically a lower cost option than other managed funds. 

Contribution options

If you’re still working, even if it’s only part-time, you can keep contributing and continue to watch your money grow. After all, no one can be sure of just how long their retirement will last, so there’s a risk of running out of retirement savings. Just remember that if you do choose to continue contributing to your KiwiSaver account, you’ll no longer be eligible for the annual member tax credit.

It will be up to your employer as to whether they continue to contribute to your KiwiSaver account. Your own contributions will continue automatically unless you ask your employer to stop your KiwiSaver deductions from your pay. You can stop your KiwiSaver deductions by giving your employer a completed KiwiSaver Non-deduction notice (KS51).

Fund options

In addition to your tolerance for risk, your investment timeframe (the number of years until you withdraw partially or fully from your KiwiSaver account) can also influence which fund you should invest in.

For example, if you won’t need to access your savings for a few more years, you may like to consider keeping your savings in a higher risk fund to maximise possible returns. Or you could split your savings out into different funds based on short-term, medium-term and long-term needs.

We recommend talking to a financial adviser about your options.

2. Withdraw some of your savings

There is some flexibility for you to dip into your savings, while still keeping your KiwiSaver account open. 

As a member of the ANZ KiwiSaver Scheme or the ANZ Default KiwiSaver Scheme you can arrange regular withdrawal amounts on a fortnightly, monthly or quarterly basis, subject to a minimum amount of $200 per fortnight, $400 per month or $1,000 per quarter. Or you can withdraw larger instalments as and when you need them (the minimum amount you can withdraw in a lump sum is $1,000).

Contribution options

You can also continue contributing to your KiwiSaver account, but you’ll no longer be eligible for the annual member tax credit.

If you’re currently contributing to KiwiSaver via your employer, you’ll need to let your employer know that you have closed your KiwiSaver account, so they can stop deducting KiwiSaver contributions from your pay. You can do this by giving your employer a completed  KiwiSaver Non-deduction notice (KS51).

3. Withdraw all of your savings and close your account

You can choose to withdraw all your savings in a single lump sum and close your KiwiSaver account. If you do choose this option, you won’t be able to open another KiwiSaver account.

If you’re currently contributing to KiwiSaver via your employer, you’ll need to let your employer know that you have closed your KiwiSaver account, so they can stop deducting KiwiSaver contributions from your pay. You can do this by giving your employer a completed KiwiSaver Non-deduction notice (KS51).

 

Are you on track with your savings?

New Zealanders are currently eligible to receive NZ Super from age 65. Based on 2016 rates, a single retired person receives NZ Super of less than $385 per week, and a couple receives less than $595 a week. Chances are, you’ll need to supplement your NZ Super with additional income, and that’s where KiwiSaver can help. 

Watch this video to find out how KiwiSaver can help supplement your NZ Super income.

According to the Massey Expenditure Guidelines a retired household is likely to need additional income, as NZ Super is inadequate to fund a comfortable retirement.

You can use our quick and easy KiwiSaver account calculator to work out how much you might need to save, and whether or not you’re on track. 

Retirement withdrawal criteria

You can begin withdrawing your KiwiSaver savings when you turn 65, as long as one of the following applies:

  • Inland Revenue received a contribution to a KiwiSaver scheme for you at least five years ago
  • you have been a member of KiwiSaver for at least five years
  • if you became a member of KiwiSaver as a result of a transfer from a complying superannuation fund, you first became a member of that complying superannuation fund at least five years ago.

What to do if you’re ready to withdraw 

If you’re eligible to make a regular, partial or full withdrawal, please download and complete the Retirement Withdrawal Application Form and Statutory Declaration and return it to us with certified identification and proof of residential address.

Please note that a KiwiSaver retirement withdrawal from the ANZ KiwiSaver Scheme or the ANZ Default KiwiSaver Scheme can take up to 10 working days to process.  We will contact you via a letter to advise if your withdrawal application was successful.

You only need to complete the Statutory Declaration Form and provide certified identification if you have not done so before (i.e. if this is your first withdrawal).

Deciding what to do with your KiwiSaver savings is important

We want you to have a comfortable retirement; one where you’re free to simply enjoy the fruits of all your hard work and not worry about money. That’s why we recommend talking to a financial adviserTogether you can work out the best way to get the most out of your KiwiSaver savings – and retirement.

If you have questions about your KiwiSaver account, call us on
0800 736 034 or email service@anzinvestments.co.nz.

 

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